The history of OER from Martin Weller’s perspective

I’m delighted to publish one more video teaser presenting another chapter from our e-Book  Education and Technology: critical approaches. Today we bring you Martin Weller, Professor of Educational Technology at the UK Open University, where he leads the OER Hub, a research centre dedicated to Open Educational Resources (OER).

Martin’s chapter, entitled ‘The development of new disciplines in education – the example of Open Education’, offers a view of the OER movement from the perspective of someone strongly engaged in the area since its origin. Watch Martin present the main ideas developed in his piece:

To complement this reading, I recommend Martin’s article ‘Different aspects of the emerging OER discipline‘, published last year in the Brazilian journal Contemporary Education and Culture. The journal published Martin’s original in English and a Portuguese translation I prepared. Also in Contemporary Education and Culture, you’ll find two articles by Giota Alevizou (also an e-Book author) which discuss Open Education from a perspective that combines political philosophy and media theories: ‘Open to interpretation? Productive frameworks for understanding audience engagement with Open Educational Resources‘ (English only) e ‘De REA a MOOC: perspectivas críticas acerca das trajetórias históricas de mediação na Educação Aberta‘ (my translation to Portuguese of the original published on the International Journal of Media & Cultural Politics – the original isn’t freely available, and the translation was done and published with the author’s and the publisher’s permissions).

From the literature in Portuguese, I recommend Andréia Inamorato Santos‘ chapter ‘Educação Aberta: histórico, práticas e o contexto dos Recursos Educacionais Abertos’ (Open Education: history, practices and the context of OER), in Recursos Educacionais Abertos: práticas colaborativas e políticas públicas (unfortunately I’ve not managed to find the book online at this point – it’s been previously avaiable on the site of Projeto REA-Brasil, via this page).

If you want to venture in the field of ‘openness’,  Martin has an interesting CC-by book: The Battle for Open – how openness won and it doesn’t feel like a victory (three different download formats, English only). In an area laterally related to OER, he’s published The Digital Scholar, another openly available book (in this case, as HTML for online reading). In this one he discusses the impact of digital technologies and Web 2.0 on academic and scholarly practice, analysing the changes that have occurred in other areas, including the music and movie industries.

Last but not least, I recommend Martin’s excellent blog.

Clarifying: I’m delighted to publish this post, as whilst I prepared the subtitles for the video, I was reminded of my arrival at the OU in 1998, when I ‘landed’ directly in the presentation of the university’s first online course (this article describes the basic ideas of a course that, like all the OU courses, was lovingly known by its code – T171). The course had been created by three ‘pioneers’ of online education (in addition to Martin, John Naughton – read his articles published on The Guardian – and Gary Alexander, who retired shortly after that), and provided a basis for Martin’s first book, Delivering learning on the net. In this course, I worked as a tutor and part of the presentation team, chaired by Martin – we were all ‘pioneers’ at that time, in a way, and I learned a great deal with his calm and unpretentious way of dealing with the many challenges facing the team (for example, to hire and train tutors to support 12k students in groups of 15, max!). I was also reminded of the motion, around the end of 1999, around the ideas of free software / open source and their possibilities for education (the widely known OpenLearn project was not the first OER initiative developed there  – I told a bit of this ‘hidden history’ – to borrow some words from Audrey Watters‘ chapter in the eBook – in this article I wrote with Alexandra Okada – English only).

Avoiding further nostalgic digressions, I wish everyone good readings, taking the opportunity to highlight we’ve got also video presentations of the e-Book chapters by Lesley Gourlay, Jeremy Knox, Richard Hall and Audrey Watters!

Anúncios

Leave your comments - Deixe seus comentários!

Preencha os seus dados abaixo ou clique em um ícone para log in:

Logotipo do WordPress.com

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta WordPress.com. Sair / Alterar )

Imagem do Twitter

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Twitter. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Facebook

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Facebook. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Google+

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Google+. Sair / Alterar )

Conectando a %s