Critical Educational Technology

Closing the series of video teasers of *Education and Technology: critical approaches* with Neil Selwyn

We’re closing today the series of video teasers of chapters in Education and Technology: critical approaches with Neil Selwyn, Professor of Education and Technology at Monash University, Australia.

Neil sent us an audio file, so I put together a slideshow with the Portuguese translation:

Neil is a key author on what is (arguably) becoming known as ‘Critical EdTech’. However, as far as I know, his work is not widely available in Portuguese: this post (in Portuguese) includes some recommendations and links to translated texts; subsequently, I translated ‘Educational Technology as ideology’ (from Distrusting Educational Technology – chapter in Portuguese) and ‘What do we mean by “education” and “tecnology”‘ (from Education and Technology: key issues and debates – chapter in Portuguese).

Closing for now: last week we had a face-to-face launch of the eBook – it was an excellent afternoon, but topic of another post…

Click here to download Neil’s e-Book chapter in Portuguese.

Click here to read the post (in Portuguese) on ‘Educational Technology as ideology’, from Distrusting Educational Technology.

Click here to read the post (in Portuguese) on  ‘What do we mean by “education” and “tecnology”‘, from Education and Technology: key issues and debates.

Click here to download the complete e-book.

 

Anúncios

Series of video teasers of the TICPE e-Book 2017: today, Ralph Ings Bannell!

Continuing with our series of video teasers produced by the contributors to Education and Technology: critical approaches, we have today a contribution by Ralph Ings Bannell, Associate Professor at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

We invited Ralph originally to write a preface for the volume, but A double-edged sword does much more than a simple presentation of chapters, one by one (integrated into the organiser’s Hybrid Resistance). To our surprise – and benefit of the readers! – he presented us with a text that, albeit longer than expected (especially by yours truly, who was already drowning in translations and revisions of the other chapters…), sheds light on issues and concerns that underpin practically all the book chapters, giving us lots of food for thought.

In his presentation, Ralph explains the structure of his piece:

Next week we shall be hosting Ralph and Raquel Goulart Barreto, who also wrote a chapter for the volume (Objects as subjects: the radical displacement), in a face-to-face launch of the book.

Click here to download the complete e-Book.

Click here to download a version in English of Raquel’s chapter.

We now give the floor to … Jeremy Knox!

Continuing the series of video teasers of the chapters in the e-Book Education and Technology: critical approaches, we now give the floor to Jeremy Knox, Lecturer at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.  The main theme of ‘How goes the revolution: three themes in the shifting MOOC landscape’ ” is, obviously, the Massive Open Online Course:

Jeremy also talks about Learning Analytics and raises important questions concerning the increasing use of automation in education.  We recommend a back-to-back reading of Ralph Ings Bannell‘s preface, ‘A double-edged sword’, which, amongst other issues, tackles the question of automation enabled by the latest developments in AI. Giota Alevizou‘s piece ‘From mediation to datafication: theorising evolving trends in media, technology and learning’ also tackles related issues within the broader context of Open Education, which is treated from a historical perspective by Martin Weller in his chapter ‘The development of new disciplines in education – the example of Open Education’.

Prior to this chapter in the e-Book, we had already published in Diálogos a translation of another piece by Jeremy: Cinco críticas ao movimento REA (in Portuguese). Unfortunately, the original blog post in English (linked to in that post) is no longer available, but Jeremy published an article based on it in Teaching in Higher Education: “Five critiques of the Open Educational Resources Movement“.

He also has an excellent book on MOOC: Posthumanism and the Massive Open Online Course , published by Routledge in 2016 – compulsory reading to anyone thinking about MOOC who may want a more substantiated reading that goes much beyond the usual exaggerated claims about their ‘disruptive’ powers.

This is the link for contacts with the author via Twitter –  https://twitter.com/j_k_knox.

Click here to download the complete e-Book.

A separate Portuguese version of the chapter is available here – and the translation to Portuguese of Five Critiques of the OER Movement can be downloaded here.

 

Com a palavra agora, Jeremy Knox!

Na sequência de apresentações em vídeo de capítulos do e-Book Educação e Tecnologia: abordagens críticas, passamos a palavra a Jeremy Knox, Professor-Pesquisador na Universidade de Edimburgo, na Escócia.  O assunto central do capítulo “A quantas anda a revolução? Três temas na movediça paisagem dos MOOC” é, obviamente, o Massive Open Online Course, Curso Aberto “Massivo” On-line, ou MOOC, como essa classe de cursos é tratada também em português:

Jeremy fala, também, sobre a área da Analítica da Aprendizagem (Learning Analytics – deixo aqui o link para o artigo na Wikipédia em inglês que trata do assunto, pois é razoavelmente detalhado) e levanta questões importantes sobre os usos cada vez frequentes de tecnologias de automatização na educação. Recomedamos a leitura “casada” do capítulo de Jeremy e do texto introdutório de Ralph Ings Bannell, Uma faca de dois gumes“, que também aborda a questão da automatização viabilizada por novas tecnologias de Inteligência Artificial. O texto de Giota Alevizou, “Da mediação à datificação: teorizando tendências em evolução nas mídias, tecnologia e aprendizagem“, também aborda questões pertinentes, no contexto mais amplo da Educação Aberta, que é tratada em uma perspectiva  histórica por Martin Weller em seu capítulo “O desenvolvimento de novas disciplinas na educação – o exemplo da Educação Aberta“.

Anteriormente a esse capítulo no e-Book, já havíamos publicado no Diálogos uma tradução de outro texto (fortemente recomendado) do autor, divulgada nesta postagemCinco críticas ao movimento REA (link direto para a versão em pdf). Infelizmente, o texto original em inglês (cujo link incluí naquele post) não está mais disponível, mas há um artigo nele baseado publicado na revista Teaching in Higher Education: “Five critiques of the Open Educational Resources Movement“.

Jeremy tem um livro excelente sobre MOOC: Posthumanism and the Massive Open Online Course , publicado pela Routledge em 2016 – leitura obrigatória para qualquer um que esteja estudando MOOC e queira aprofundar a discussão para além das alegações exageradas sobre seu potencial de “perturbação” (a bendita “disrupção” da qual tanto se tem falado por aí) da educação.

Este é o link para contatos com o autor via Twitter –  https://twitter.com/j_k_knox.

Você pode baixar o e-Book clicando aqui.

Alternativamente, acesse uma separata da versão em português de seu capítulo clicando aqui.

Por fim, clique aqui para baixar diretamente a tradução para o português de Five Critique of the OER Movement.

 

 

… and the next TICPE-2017 e-Book chapter introduced in a video commentary is…

… ‘Performance information and data-driven academic anxiety’, by Richard Hall, Professor of Education and Technology at De Montfort University, England.

Without further ado, here is the author’s presentation (with subtitles in Portuguese):

Although Richard’s discussion addresses Higher Education in the ‘global North’, in particular, in the UK, readers should be able to notice – reading also Raquel Goulart Barreto‘s ‘Objects as subject: the radical displacement’, that there are several points of contact between Richard’s concerns and questions confronting us in Brazil (and, assumedly, in many other places). In particular: questions concerning teaching associated with market logics and technocractic views of Education and Technology) represented in the types of instructionist Educational Technology that predominate in the “market”). There is a great deal to think about here, a lot of work to be done.

The author keeps the blog Richard Hall’s Space, recommended to anyone interested in questions related to the presence of technology in Higher Education, specifically.

A Portuguese version of Richard’s chapter can be download here.

Alternatively, click here to download the complete e-Book – and take the opportunity to watch (or re-watch) the previous video in the series, by Audrey Watters!

Audrey Watters talks about her chapters in “Education and Technology: critical approaches”

Launching our YouTube channel, in the next few weeks we’ll be publishing various posts on our latest e-Book, Education and Technology: critical approachesEach post will focus on a book chapter, which will be presented by the author(s) in videos exclusively produced for us as teasers (or tasters) for the volume.

We start today with Audrey Watters, author of ‘The History of the Future of Ed-Tech’ and ‘Un-fathomable: the hidden history of Ed-Tech’ , included in Part III of the e-Book, Historicity. In the video, Audrey talks about her contribution, presenting ideas that underpin her work as an independent scholar and writer, and showing that her nickname – Cassandra of Ed-Tech – is quite appropriate.

Watch the video (subtitles in Portuguese by Giselle Ferreira):

Click here to download the e-Book.

Click here to download Audrey’s chapters in Portuguese.

Last but not least, click here to visit Audrey’s blog, Hack Education.